Will your sales agents actually sell?

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Three people sitting in a row at a table with the last woman leaning in to look at the other two

10/07/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

When you sponsor new sales agents, you take a chance on their success. They may hit the ground running, generating leads on day one … or they may go six months without achieving a goal. But there are a few ways to determine early on how successful your new recruits will be.

They listen. New agents who ask prospective clients questions and pay attention to their responses may find more success than those who fill the conversation.

They ask you questions. You’re probably taking on new agents because your business is growing—that means you have a thing or two to teach about selling real estate.

You know their goals. Whether your new sales agents set their own benchmarks or you set goals for them, it’s important for you to know their plans and for them to know they're accountable to you.

They do the grunt work. Tasks like cold calling and desk duty may not be glamorous, but they show that your agents are willing to work and learn in the process.

They're willing to try new tactics. Agents who are set in their ways and not receptive to innovation may be costing you new business.

They move forward. All agents will face challenging deals, but the successful ones see the failed transactions as lessons learned and opportunities to follow up in the future.

What traits do the successful agents you’ve sponsored have in common? Share your comments below.

Categories: Business tips
Tags: brokers, business tips, sponsorship, sales agents


Comments

Lane Mabray on 10/07/2015

The two buyer agents that I sponsored, had the trait of “Greed” also….One buyer agent had other income, so was not as motivated…. Both went on to go out on their own. Took some of my clients with them. Not good.

Linda Dietz/Century21 on 10/07/2015

They show up to work early, dress professionally daily and actually work in their Real Estate Business without making excuses why certain kinds of prospecting do not work, like cold calling;  picking up the phone or knocking on doors.  They think that telling a Broker or Manager that they are working from home or are diligently prospecting on the street is convincing, however, if they were really making the effort,  history shows those successful results with new listings and closings.  So, if no new listings and no closings who are they really fooling?


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The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

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