Why your persuasion tactics may not be working as well as you think

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08/16/2016 | Author: Editorial Staff

You employ it during listing presentations and for negotiations. You even use it at home with your kids or when you’re buying a new car. There are many times you use persuasion, but new research from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University may make you think differently about your approach.

Many believe the most persuasive people are those who exude powerfulness, especially over an impressionable audience. However, researchers from the Kellogg School found that matching your audience’s level of confidence is a more effective way to persuade them. Specifically, they found that pitches focusing on competence and skillfulness were effective on audiences who felt more powerful, while pitches emphasizing warmth and sincerity persuaded audiences who felt powerless.

To try this persuasion approach, you should match your message to your audience. For example, first-time sellers may not know much about the selling process, resulting in a little bit of confusion and unease. While you should give them a listing presentation that showcases your knowledge, you’ll probably want to play up your trustworthiness and dependability a little more than your selling savvy. On the other hand, you might want to take a more powerful approach that highlights your competence when negotiating with another experienced REALTOR®.

Read more about the study and its results from Kellogg Insight.

Categories: Business tips
Tags: persuasion, negotiation, listing presentation


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The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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