How to take up valuable real estate on Facebook

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03/18/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

It’s not enough to just have a Facebook account to market your business successfully ... you have to use it well. If you aren’t taking full advantage of Facebook’s features, you could be missing out on opportunities to get your name in front of potential clients up to 14 times per day on average. One of the best ways to reach consumers on Facebook is by targeting your News Feed posts.

7 ways to target your posts
Facebook allows you to target posts published in your News Feed. The posts remain visible to anyone who visits your page, but they only appear in the News Feeds of followers who match the criteria you selected.

There are currently seven ways to target a post to a segment of your followers:

  • Gender
  • Relationship Status
  • Educational Status
  • Age
  • Location
  • Language
  • Interests

When to use this feature
Targeting allows you to share info with the people who are most likely to be interested. For example, when you’re sharing info about a community event, target people who are located in your city. When you post an article with landscaping tips, set the target to people who have identified gardening as an interest.

Remember the rules
If you’re marketing brokerage services or advertising property, remember that fair housing laws prohibit you from discriminating against someone because of his or her race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or handicap. 

Learn more about targeting your posts at facebook.com/business.

Categories: Business tips
Tags: social media, marketing, business tips


Comments

Koehler Real Estate on 03/19/2015

So based on rules of fair housing law, there is only 5 and not 7 ways available for real estate agents to target their posts on Facebook: Educational Status, Age, Location, Language and Interests. Is that correct?


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