How to collect your fee when your client refuses to sell

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02/20/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

My client received a full-price offer on a property I listed for him after signing a Residential Real Estate Listing Agreement Exclusive Right to Sell (TAR 1101), but he now states he is no longer interested in selling his property and refuses to accept the offer. I believe that I still deserve my commission because I fulfilled my obligation under the listing agreement by bringing him a suitable buyer. Am I still entitled to receive my commission?

Yes. Paragraph 5 of the TAR Listing Agreement explains that a seller will pay the broker either a percentage of the sales price or a set fee when the compensation is earned and payable. This paragraph also lists the circumstances when compensation is deemed “earned” and “payable.”

In this situation, you could argue that the compensation was earned when you procured a buyer who was ready, willing, and able to buy the property at the listing price, and the compensation was payable when the seller refused to sell the property after your compensation had been earned. Alternatively, you could argue that the seller’s refusal to sell the property was a breach of the TAR Listing Agreement, and that compensation was earned and payable as a result of that breach.

If negotiations with your client fail and your client is not willing to pay your compensation, you may need to contact an attorney.

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Categories: Forms, Legal
Tags: legal, legal faq, forms, listing agreement, commission

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Legal disclaimer

The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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