Help your Spanish-speaking clients understand the transaction

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03/22/2016 | Author: Editorial Staff

Did you know that the Texas Association of REALTORS® provides members exclusive access to Spanish versions of 18 of the most commonly used forms? While only English versions of TAR forms can be used as legal documents, the translated forms will help your Spanish-speaking clients get a better idea of what they’re signing. Plus, the Spanish forms were updated recently to reflect revisions to TAR and Texas Real Estate Commission forms that went into effect earlier this year.

See all the Spanish forms available to you on texasrealestate.com.

Categories: Forms
Tags: spanish forms, forms, legal


Comments

Candy Cargill on 03/28/2016

I really didn’t make myself clear…in some areas, English is the second Language, in normal day to day life, Spanish is spoken.  I think it would be beneficial to have all sorts of information from the Association in Spanish also.  This would be really important during a year where one of our REALTOR Issues is on the ballot.  I know you have received some of the mailers or flyers…those are what I’m talking about being in Spanish, too.  As well as a proper translation, it seems,  of the contract forms.

Tony Fernandez Jr. on 03/28/2016

I speak Spanish.

Candy Cargill on 03/25/2016

I think TAR does a good job of trying to help our REALTORS who deal with Spanish Speaking Clients (both buyers and sellers).  They even have a workplace Spanish Course I have on my “round to it” list. 
I do wish they would expand the Spanish versions into issues that we are wanting REALTORS to vote for and explain to clients why those issues are important.
The voting ballot is in Spanish, why can’t an explanation of what is on the ballot be in Spanish, too?

Rachel Savant on 03/24/2016

I have run into the same issue when working with Spanish-speaking clients. I present both the English and Spanish forms side by side for reference but I usually resort to just translating the English version and putting the Spanish one to the side because it confuses people. I am hoping that these forms will be updated. Thanks for posting!

Mike McEwen on 03/23/2016

El hecho de que estamos de acuerdo me da mucho gusto gusto.

Adrian Garza on 03/23/2016

I agree with you Mike, 90% of my buyers are spanish speaking, I show them both forms but have to clarify some terms that they don’t understand.

Mike McEwen on 03/22/2016

As a fluent speaker of Spanish, some of the terms used in the forms are completely incorrect.  When a technical document is being translated technical knowledge of both languages is required.  Example:  When the English term “Addition” (AKA subdivision) is used in the Spanish version, the term “Adición” is used and that is incorrect.  The correct term in Spanish is “Fraccionamiento”.....literally a fractioned (subdivided) piece of land.  There are many other examples.  The Texas A&M Real Estate Research Center has an excellent English/Spanish—Spanish/English dictionary of real estate terms.


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Legal disclaimer

The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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