Have an FAA exemption to fly your drone for business? You could still get fined

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Drone flying in the air

10/13/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

If you’re one of the more than 1,800 operators the Federal Aviation Administration has granted an exemption to fly drones commercially, listen up: the FAA has plans to go after operators who don’t follow the rules.

Last week, the FAA proposed a $1.9 million civil penalty against a Chicago-based drone operator for allegedly violating airspace regulations and other operating rules. It’s the largest civil penalty the FAA has proposed against a drone operator for violating such safety regulations.

The company, SkyPan, has 30 days after receiving the FAA’s enforcement letter to respond. The company’s president told NPR the proposed fine is ridiculous, and the company has plans to discuss the fine with the FAA.

Even if you’ve been granted a Section 333 exemption to fly your drone for your real estate business, you are still bound to the regulations and policies outlined by the FAA for operating your device, and could face serious financial consequences if you don’t.

Categories: Business tips
Tags: drones


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