Do I need a license to sell my client’s manufactured home?

Translate this page
The corner of the exterior of a cream-colored manufacture home with green trim.

11/20/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

I’m a licensed real estate sales agent, and I’m working with a client who wants to sell his manufactured home. Do I need to be licensed by the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs as a manufactured-housing broker to negotiate the sale of my client’s property?

Whether you need to be licensed as a manufactured-housing broker by the TDHCA depends on the property and your recent transactions.

You can take part in the transaction without becoming licensed as a manufactured-housing broker if three criteria are met: 

  • the home is attached to the real property,
  • the same person is the record owner of both the manufactured home and the real property, and
  • the sale or lease occurs in a single real estate transaction.

There’s also an exemption to the licensing requirement if those elements don’t apply and you haven’t negotiated any manufactured-housing transactions in the past 12 months.

However, if the above elements don’t apply and you have negotiated any similar transactions in the past 12 months, you would be considered to be acting as a manufactured-housing broker by negotiating this sale and must be licensed by the TDHCA to comply with state law.

Read more legal FAQs at, and check out the November 2015 issue of Texas REALTOR® magazine to read tips for working with manufactured-home buyers.

Categories: Legal
Tags: legal, legal faq, manufactured home, manufactured housing, magazine


No comments have been submitted for this entry.

Leave a Comment

Read our commenting policy

advertise with us

Legal disclaimer

The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on Any legal or other information found here, on, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

Advice for REALTORS®

When and how to disclose agency

How Texas REALTORS® are preparing to lead in 2017

What you need to know about advertising rules

Luxury home sales remain strong in 2016


More advice for REALTORS®