Can a landlord refuse to rent to a sex offender?

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08/21/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

I manage a multi-family property for my client. A prospective tenant has submitted a rental application, and a criminal background check revealed that he is a registered sex offender. Can the property owner refuse to rent his property based on the fact that the prospective tenant is a registered sex offender?

 Yes. Sex offenders are not protected under the Fair Housing Act.

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Categories: Legal, Landlords, Renters
Tags: legal, legal faq, renters, property managers, property management, leasing


Comments

geo malmos on 06/11/2016

do you have any contacts in the portland, oregon area.?
after 7 years i just got a no cause eviction.i have no idea why, i pay my rent a week early.
my offense was 16+ years ago. it was with an adult woman.

kristin watson on 08/31/2015

A big majority of registered sex offenders need a 2nd chance I DO RENT to them based on their charges.  You can actually get a full print out of the charges and the ages they offended against.  If its a child over 16 I don’t consider that a pedophile.  If you read their cases some of them have gone on to marry and have kids w the victim.  I’m talking about young men who were 18 to 20 yrs old and offended on 16 & 17 year olds.  Another way to decide if I rent to them is,  if the Sex offender requires a sign by his front door that means it was a serious offense.  If they don’t require a sign then I usually rent to them.  Everyone needs a 2nd chance and a place to live.  There are strategic ways to place a S.O. on your property NEVER in the Family section or near a bus stop!


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