Another way to market yourself that you may have missed

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04/26/2016 | Author: Editorial Staff

You get a lot out of knowledge out of the designations and certifications you’ve earned, but are you really using them in every way you could? Start making them a part of your marketing plan with these tips.

Spell it out. If you’re using the acronym after your name in your signature block, spell it out instead. Many people don’t know what the acronyms stand for, and it will be more effective marketing when people see you’re a Real Estate Negotiation Expert instead of wondering what "RENE" means.

Think beyond your signature block. When you communicate with prospects and clients, point out those acronyms and how having them makes your services more valuable. Of course, you can do this during a conversation, but you can also put these details on your website or in your listing presentation presentation packet. For example, you could say, “I’ve earned the Military Relocation Professional certification, which means I know how to help current and former members of the military take advantage of military benefits when buying a home.”

Use your designation’s ready-made marketing materials. Did you know that many designations and certifications come with free, ready-made marketing materials? Once you’ve earned your designation or certification, you gain access to these materials that may include postcards, web banner ads, and fliers. Visit the Designations & Certifications section of to find direct links to several designations’ and certifications’ home pages for more information. 

Categories: Business tips
Tags: marketing, designations, business tips


THERESA AKIN on 04/30/2016

This can easily be explained on one’s website, email signature and/or the back of the agent’s business card.

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The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on Any legal or other information found here, on, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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