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5 ways to help military clients and veterans become homeowners

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11/11/2014 | Author: Editorial Staff

Texas is home to several military bases and one of the largest populations of veterans in the country. Here are a few resources you can use to help these consumers reach their real estate goals.  

  • Register now for the Nov. 17 free, one-hour webinar about helping homeowners. You’ll learn about programs just for Texas veterans as part of this session. 
  • Earn the Texas Affordable Housing Specialist (TAHS) certification via video broadcast on Nov. 18-19. One of the four required courses, “United Texas: Housing Initiatives that Work,” will cover programs that Texas veterans can use along with their federal VA benefits, such as loans with below-market interest rates. To find a location near you, visit the Find a Course page on texasrealestate.com, and select “TAHS Certification courses” from the Groups field.
  • Earn the Military Relocation Professional (MRP) certification from the National Association of REALTORS®. You’ll learn how to communicate with military clients, how a lender determines who's eligible for a VA loan, and how to help service members overcome potential homebuying challenges. The course is offered online and at locations near you.
  • Increase your lending expertise for military clients by watching the free, one-hour webinar “Understanding VA and FHA financing for your clients.”
  • Help military homebuyers search for local, state, and federal programs, and have them visit the Texas State Affordable Housing Corporation website to see if they qualify for the Homes for Texas Heroes Program or the Affordable Communities of Texas-Veterans Housing Initiative. 

Categories: Continuing education, Buyers
Tags: military, veterans, homebuyers, buyers

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Legal disclaimer

The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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