5 ways to add Pinterest to your marketing

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07/27/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

About one-third of adult Internet users are on Pinterest, according to the Pew Research Center. Here’s how to put your name in front of these consumers. 

  • Provide content your followers want to see. Create boards with pins relevant to your business and your followers’ interests (things to do in your city, info for new homeowners, landscaping ideas specific to your market, etc.).
  • Help users find you. Use keywords in your pin captions to ensure they appear in search results. For example, when pinning a site about pet-friendly businesses in your area, use helpful keywords like, “Dog-friendly restaurants in San Antonio, Texas.”
  • Test your own site's pin-ability. Sharing your own content drives traffic to your website and may generate leads, but Pinterest works best with webpages that have images. Try pinning a page from your own site to see if there are pin-worthy images. 
  • Show samples of your work. Create boards with your listings to show potential clients  of how you market the properties with professional photos, video tours, and staging. Just be sure to comply with advertising rules and your MLS's rules about sharing listings via social media.
  • Promote your page. Include a Pinterest button that links to your feed along with the other social media icons on your website, blog, newsletters, and email signature to give people direct access to your page.

If you use Pinterest in your real estate business, comment below to share what works for you. 

Categories: Business tips
Tags: social media, marketing, pinterest


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The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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