4 ways to help your clients downsize

Translate this page
A man and woman pulling a for sale sign with a sold rider on it with a child running in the background

02/02/2016 | Author: Editorial Staff

There are many reasons your sellers may be making a move, but you can help your clients in any type of downsizing situation with this basic advice.

Understand why they are moving. While you don’t need to meddle in your clients’ life, you should learn how their property needs are different from before. This could mean gathering more details than just how may bedrooms and bathrooms they want, like whether they need to live closer to public transportation or medical care.

Help them downsize their stuff, too. Some people have difficulty parting with their belongings and don’t know how to start the process. Be prepared with recommendations for professional organizers, estate companies, and other specialists. And be patient with these sellers, since it may take them longer to prep their property for showings.

Make sure they don’t have misconceptions about cost. Sometimes downsizing can mean savings for sellers, but not always. For instance, they may be moving to a place with a higher cost of living. Or they may not make as much from the sale of their current property as they think. Just like your other sellers, make sure your downsizing clients are aware of the financial realities of their move.

Earn the SRES designation. Although not all downsizing sellers are seniors, many are. Earning NAR’s Seniors Real Estate Specialist designation gives you insights into working with seniors and teaches you how to ease your clients’ transition. Learn more at seniorsrealestate.com.

Categories: Business tips
Tags: sellers, seniors, downsizing


Comments

No comments have been submitted for this entry.


Leave a Comment

Read our commenting policy



advertise with us

Legal disclaimer

The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

Advice for REALTORS®

What you don’t know about Texas license holders

How to talk to your clients about student debt

Does a property need to be rekeyed if the owner was the previous occupant?

How REALTORS® stay safe

Subscribe

More advice for REALTORS®