You don’t have to make this mistake when buying your first home

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Man and woman looking at a two-story white home with a for sale sign in front of it

03/28/2014 | Author: Jaime Lee

Now that the weather is turning around in Texas, you may be thinking about starting the search for your first home. But once you're viewing homes in person, please don't fall into the trap that ensnares many first-time homebuyers: don't let relatively small flaws or easy fixes influence your decision about a home. Vetoing homes because of patchy yards or outdated fixtures can lead to months of frustrated searching and a shorter and shorter list of potential properties.

You should expect to encounter properties with minor cosmetic issues—these shouldn't be confused with major issues such as a cracked foundation or leaking roof that can take significant time and financial investment to address. I'm talking about a squeaky door, faded carpet, or paint colors that aren't your favorite. 

If you reject a home simply because of issues like these, your Texas REALTOR® will remind you that these are easy fixes that allow you to personalize the home. You may even be able to turn outdated or unattractive features into negotiating points.​ It’s in your best interest to see past those small concerns and see the whole picture of what could be your dream house. 

Categories: Buyers
Tags: buyers, consumers, negotiation


Comments

Janet Cummings on 03/29/2014

It’s true!  If a house has not been “updated”, many Buyers will not ever go look at it although everything about it may be “solid!”  And, they may be overlooking
great potential homes!

Hazel Edwards on 03/28/2014

As Realtors, we all need to encourage our buyer clients to follow this sage advice.  Staging and updates have gone overboard contributing to the increase in price along with the lack of inventory.  Instead of encouraging sellers to update and stage, perhaps the emphasis should be on sharing the contact info for experienced contractors and handymen.


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