Sellers, here’s what buyers really think about your home

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A woman with glasses using a magnifying glass to look at a toy house in her hand

11/13/2015 | Author: Summer Mandell

Have you ever wondered what a potential homebuyer thinks when she visits your house? Here are a few questions that came to my mind when I was searching for my first home.

What’s that smell? I never realized how sensitive I am to smells until I saw eight houses in one day. The pet smells, air fresheners, mildew, and fresh-paint odors left me with a pounding headache. Some people love the smell of cinnamon apples and others might not, but get some help from your Texas REALTOR® to figure out a way to create a more neutral smelling experience. That might mean opening a few windows before a showing or temporarily moving the litter box.

Will that dog bite us? As a pet owner, I know I can’t always take my dog or cat with me wherever I go. If you can take your pets with you when a buyer comes for a viewing, though, it can make for a much better home-tour experience. Why? Some people might be afraid of your pet. Other times, your pet can be a distraction. It’s hard to concentrate when a barking dog accompanies you on your property tour.

Where would I put my stuff? It’s true what they say: buyers have a hard time looking past excessive clutter. When that spacious closet you’re trying to sell  is packed full, I can’t tell how spacious it truly is. And navigating through your kids’ toy maze is just as annoying for me as it is for you.

It’s hard to please every potential homebuyer who will walk through your door, but there are a few simple ways to make your home a little more inviting so your house isn’t known as “the one with the cat smell” or “the one with the toy booby trap.” Talk to your Texas REALTOR® and be open to his advice about preparing your home for sale. He’ll know what attracts homebuyers to a property, and he’s on your side to get it sold.

Categories: Sellers
Tags: sellers, consumers


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The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on Any legal or other information found here, on, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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