Avoid these mistakes between loan approval and closing

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An man in a suit extends a set of keys with a For Sale sign partially visible in the background.

07/08/2016 | Author: Ward Lowe

You've been careful with your finances, saved for a downpayment, and finally received approval for a mortgage loan. It’s time to celebrate, right?

Not yet. Your lender will recheck your credit right before closing. Don't give him or her reason to question your creditworthiness by making these mistakes:

1. Changing jobs

Changing employers could mean delays due to employment and salary verifications. Of course, you shouldn't ignore a great career opportunity. It means only that optional moves should wait.

2. Making a big purchase

Your debt-to-income ratio is an important factor when being considered for a loan. If you add to your debt by purchasing a car or boat, you risk exceeding the ratio that your lender finds acceptable. 

3. Opening credit accounts

You might apply for a credit card so you're ready to buy furniture for your new house. But similar to taking on new debt, applying for a new credit account can harm your mortgage approval. The credit inquiry necessary for the new account will ding your credit score a few points, and the lender might wonder just how much you plan on spending with that new account.

Part of the mortgage process is a final check to ensure you can afford the loan. Neither you nor the lender wants the payments to be a struggle, so don’t give the lender any reason to doubt your creditworthiness.

There are other ways a transaction can fall apart before closing. Be sure to consult with your Texas REALTOR® about contract deadlines and other to-do items to ensure you close on your new property.

Categories: Buyers
Tags: buyers, credit report, credit score, mortgage


Tiffany on 08/31/2016

Good advice. Thanks.

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The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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