6 renovations that will give you the best—and lowest—return on investment

Translate this page
A worker hitting the corner of an exterior wall with a sledgehammer

04/03/2015 | Author: Editorial Staff

Thinking of adding a deck this year? Need to replace your garage door? While you may not be looking forward to spending money on those upgrades, there’s good news: They may help your resale value.

The 2015 Texas Remodel Valuation Report, released this week by the Texas Association of REALTORS®, shows that garage door replacements recouped up to 107.6% of the total project cost, ranking in the top five most profitable projects nationwide, regionally, and in four Texas cities. Wood deck additions recouped up to 116% of their cost.

Those aren’t the only upgrades that were good investments in 2014. Here are three others you may want to consider:

  • Back-up power generator. The most profitable project, which recouped 129.2% of its cost.
  • Steel entry door. Installing this type of door recouped up to 113.2% of its cost.
  • Basement remodels. Projects that maximized existing square footage were good investments last year, with basement remodels recouping 98% of their project costs.

And here are three you might want to save for another time:

  • Sunroom addition. This project showed the least return on investment, recouping as little as 29.3% of the total project cost.
  • Home-office remodel. Renovating a home office closely follows sunroom additions as one of the least profitable remodeling projects, recouping a maximum of 62.2% of the project cost.
  • Master-suite additions. Both typical and upscale renovations were unprofitable. These projects ranked among the five least profitable projects.

View the full report on texasrealestate.com.

Categories: Research
Tags: research, consumers, renovation


Comments

No comments have been submitted for this entry.


Leave a Comment

Read our commenting policy



advertise with us

Legal disclaimer

The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

Advice for Consumers

What to update before selling your house

4 signs the home you’re considering might need a foundation evaluation

Five reasons to include a home warranty with your home’s sale

Subscribe

More advice for consumers