4 expenses homebuyers should keep in mind

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A man holds a set of silver keys in one hand and a small model house in the other.

01/29/2016 | Author: Jaime Lee

When starting your house hunt online, you'll see that most real estate websites let you search by price range. But a real estate purchase will cost you more than just the sale price. Here are four costs you'll want to consider before submitting an offer. 

  1. Downpayment Some lenders require borrowers to pay up to 20% of the loan at closing. It may take a while to save up that much, but paying a chunk of your loan up front will lower your monthly payment. 
  2. Mortgage insurance If you don't pay at least 20% of the purchase price as a downpayment, your lender will probably require you to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI) that protects the lender if you default on the loan. 
  3. Closing costs Buyers and sellers can negotiate how much each party pays at closing. Unless the seller agrees to pay all of the closing costs, you'll be responsible for paying a portion of these fees. 
  4. Monthly payment Your payments will cover principal, interest, taxes, and insurance. You may have other recurring expenses, such as HOA dues and home maintenance, to factor into your budget.

When you're ready to become a homeowner, contact a Texas REALTOR® to determine how much you can realistically afford and which costs you can negotiate. 

Categories: Buyers, Homeowners, Renters
Tags: homebuyers, buyers, renters, buying


Sandra Spencer on 03/14/2016

I have been buying a home under the contract of sale, now the sellers are saying that I signed a contract of deed and I do not have access to a deed because it is listed under another name other than what is on the contract of sale. I have not signed a contract of deed. What to do? The sale price is now different then what I signed up for.

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The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While the Texas Association of REALTORS® has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the Texas Association of REALTORS® makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com. Any legal or other information found here, on texasrealestate.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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